Jurgen Klopp: Don’t ask me about coronavirus, ask the experts.

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Liverpool’s wealthy owners under fire for using tax payers money but there is no arguing with the logic of Jurgen Klopp

There is so much truth and compassion in what Jurgen Klopp manager of Premier League club Liverpool had to say but it didn’t make the question of tax payer funding go away.

Liverpool’s wealthy owners have come under fire from former star players for their decision to furlough some non-playing staff during the coronavirus pandemic.

It is reported that some 200 staff are affected and they will receive 80 percent of their salary through a financial rescue scheme introduced by the U.K. government, with Liverpool topping up the remainder.

The runaway English Premier League (EPL) leader is following Tottenham Hotspur, Newcastle, Bournemouth and Norwich in turning to the bailout scheme.

Liverpool co-owners John W Henry (left) and chairman Tom Werner have seen the club’s fortunes improve since taking over the club in 2010.”The club has confirmed those staff will be paid 100 per cent of their salaries to ensure no member of staff is financially disadvantaged.

Last month the club also confirmed that it would pay its matchday and non-matchday staff while the Premier League is suspended, a statement on the Liverpool website said “Even prior to the decision on staff furloughing, there was a collective commitment at senior levels of the club — on and off the pitch — with everyone working towards a solution that secures jobs for employees of the club during this unprecedented crisis.”There is ongoing active engagement about the topic of salary deductions during the period matches are not being played to schedule.

Reigning champion Manchester City said Sunday that it would not be using tax payer money.

In contrast Manchester City ‘said no’ to tax payer funding. Manchester City, who pipped Liverpool to the title last season, released a statement to back up its stance. “We can confirm, following a decision by the chairman and board last week, that Manchester City will not be utilising the government’s coronavirus job retention scheme. “We remain determined to protect our people, their jobs and our business whilst at the same time doing what we can to support our wider community at this challenging time for everybody,” it read.

Some of Liverpool’s Past Legends made their feelings known

The decision to furlough some non-playing staff was criticised on Twitter by former Liverpool captain Carragher.

These discussions are complex and as a result the process is ongoing.”But the decision did not impress former club vice-captain and stalwart Jamie Carragher, who took to social media to air his views.

He tweeted: “Jurgen Klopp showed compassion for all at the start of this pandemic, senior players heavily involved in Premier League players taking wage cuts. Then all that respect and goodwill is lost – poor this, LFC.”

Former Liverpool forward Collymore, meanwhile, wrote on social media: “I don’t know of any Liverpool fan of any standing that won’t be anything other than disgusted at the club for furloughing staff. It’s just plain wrong.

“Fellow football fans, furlough is for small business staff to keep those small businesses from going bump!

“Every Premier League owner has serious cash, and makes money from skyrocketing values of clubs, so what aren’t you getting about your owners dipping into their pocket?”

In February, the club announced they had made a pre-tax profit of £42m and increased turnover to £533m. Last year they also spent £43m on agents’ fees.

There was criticism when Newcastle and Tottenham became the first Premier League clubs to announce they were placing non-playing staff on furlough.

Health secretary Matt Hancock said Premier League players should “take a pay cut and play their part” during the pandemic.

Since then, Premier League clubs have said they will ask players to take a 30% pay cut in order to protect jobs.

#LiverpoolFC#Coronavirus#SocialDistancing#NHSPPE#StayHomeSaveLives#PPEforNHS

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