Coronavirus: No let up to the Lockdown

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Boris Johnson has claimed the UK is “beginning to turn the tide” on coronavirus but said a relaxation of lockdown would “risk a second major outbreak”.

Boris Johnson says this is moment of maximum risk

Boris Johnson has claimed the UK is “beginning to turn the tide” on coronavirus but said a relaxation of lockdown would “risk a second major outbreak”.

On his return to work following his treatment for Covid-19, a virus he described as an “invisible mugger”, the prime minister said social distancing was working, but said now is the “moment of maximum risk”.

Speaking from outside Downing Street, where he has not been seen in public since being taken to hospital on April 5, Mr Johnson said the UK is “coming to the end of the first phase of the conflict”.

He encouraged people to “contain your impatience” with lockdown, by sticking with restrictions, but his speech was short of detail explaining just how measures may eventually be eased.

Johnson is under pressure from Economy first politicians within his own party and from Labour leader Sir Keir Starmer, to release his lockdown “exit strategy” but he resisted temptation, saying there’ll be “much more” detail in coming days.

Cooler heads prevail

Meanwhile cooler heads like Laura Pidcock captures the reality of the moment. Pidcock expressed in her Tweet :

“Why on earth are some even entertaining an easing of the lockdown? We must demand widening it to a shut down of all non-essential work. The conditions for an easing do not exist yet. Mass testing, contact tracing, physical distancing and eventual vaccination are the priorities.”

Johnson said once the government’s “five tests” had been met, then restrictions would “gradually” ease, in order to “one-by-one to fire up the engines of this vast UK economy”.

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