Allegra Stratton resigns after No 10 Christmas party video

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Allegra Stratton resigns after No 10 Christmas party video

Still no admittance on a Party happening.

Allegra Stratton has stepped down as the government’s spokesperson for the Cop26 climate summit after footage emerged of her joking about a party at Downing Street during the peak of lockdown rules in December last year.

In a video recording of what is reported to be a rehearsal for a TV media briefing, Allegra Stratton and senior Number 10 aides were filmed talking and laughing about a Christmas party.

They also jokingly referred to a “business meeting” and a “cheese and wine” event.

The footage, obtained by ITV News, is said to be from 22 December last year – four days after an alleged Christmas party took place in Number 10.

In a statement sent to journalists and read out to TV crews in front of her home, Boris Johnson’s former press secretary said she deeply regretted joking with other No 10 aides during a rehearsal for a later-dropped plan for filmed Downing Street press conferences.

“The British people have made immense sacrifices in the battle against Covid 19. I now fear that my comments in the leaked video of 20 December may have become a distraction against that fight,” she said.

“My remarks seemed to make light of the rules, rules that people were doing everything to obey. That was never my intention. I will regret those remarks for the rest of my days and offer my profound apologies to all of you for them.”

Saying she remained proud of her work on Cop26, Stratton said: “I understand the anger and frustration that people feel. To all of you who lost loved ones, endured intolerable loneliness and struggled with your businesses – I am sorry and this afternoon I have offered my resignation to the prime minister.”

Stratton moved to her Cop26 role after the planned Downing Street briefings were axed. A former journalist for the Guardian, BBC and ITV, Stratton also worked for the chancellor, Rishi Sunak, before switching to No 10.

Watch: Stratton’s tearful resignation statement

Allegra Stratton’s resignation statement in full

The British people have made immense sacrifices in the ongoing battle against Covid-19, I now realise my comments in the leaked video of 20 December last year have become a distraction in that fight.

My remarks seemed to make light of the rules, rules that people were doing everything to obey. That was never my intention. I will regret those remarks for the rest of my days and I offer my profound apologies to all of you at home for them.Quote Message: Working in government is an immense privilege.

I tried to do right by you all, to behave with civility and decency and up to the high standards you rightly expect of No 10. I will always be proud of what was achieved at COP26 in Glasgow and the progress that was made on coal, cars, cash and trees. This country and the prime minister’s leadership on climate change and on nature will make a lasting difference to the whole world. It has been an honour to play a part in that. I understand the anger and frustration that people feel.

Working in government is an immense privilege. I tried to do right by you all, to behave with civility and decency and up to the high standards you rightly expect of No 10. I will always be proud of what was achieved at COP26 in Glasgow and the progress that was made on coal, cars, cash and trees.

This country and the prime minister’s leadership on climate change and on nature will make a lasting difference to the whole world. It has been an honour to play a part in that. I understand the anger and frustration that people feel.

Quote Message: To all of you who lost loved ones, who endured intolerable loneliness and who struggled with your businesses, I am truly sorry and this afternoon I am offering my resignation to the prime minister.

Allegra Stratton.

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