Labour abstain on vote allowing real-terms Universal Credit and Pension cuts to go unopposed

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Labour abstain allowing real terms universal credit cuts unopposed

Pensioners and universal credit claimants face a tough, bleak year.

The real-terms cuts passed a House of Commons vote 298-29, not even a token gesture of opposition from Starmer who whipped the Labour party to abstain.

This comes when the Bank of England has warned inflation could hit 7.25% by April, there is no doubt, this is a real-terms cut, yet Labour has abstained on the vote.

In total, 29 MPs voted against with 13 Labour MPs and one Tory, Peter Bottomley, defying the whip to vote against the below-inflation rise.

The results see Benefit and pension rates both rising by 3.1%, in line with what inflation was last Autumn.

Campaigners sounded the alarm as families face soaring inflation – already 4.8% – and a cost-of-living crisis.

The Universal Credit standard allowance will rise by just £2.51 a week or £10.07 a month from April 11 to £334.91 for over-25s.

Meanwhile the pensions triple lock – which would have raised the state pension by more than 8% – was suspended.

That means the state pension will rise by just £5.55 a week to £185.15. Ministers blamed a “statistical anomaly” that would have seen pensions rising artificially based on a bounce-back in wages.

State pension would be £355 worse off next year due to the below-inflation rise – wiping out the £350 in help for energy bills.

Only 13 Labour MPs voted against the bill

Labour abstain
Only 13 Labour MPs voted against the bill

Tellers for the Noes

Members voting No

Alliance (1)Conservative (1)Democratic Unionist Party (7)

Independent (3)

Labour (13)

Scottish National Party (2)

Social Democratic & Labour Party (2)

https://votes.parliament.uk/Votes/Commons/Division/1221#noes

The rest of the Labour Party followed Starmer’s whip and by abstaining were counted as Ayes

We have not seen a cost of living raise of this scale for over 30 years the oppersition isn’t even opposing anymore

But let’s be honest, Labour can say what they like, it’s meaningless if they are not even voting against real-terms cuts, remind me, what’s the point of Labour?

New DWP payment rates from 2022 to 2023

Weekly rates are shown unless otherwise stated.

Attendance Allowance

  • Higher rate: £92.40 (from £89.60)
  • Lower rate: £61.85 (from £60.00)

Carer’s Allowance

  • April 2022 rate: £69.70 (from £67.60)

Disability Living Allowance

Care Component

  • Highest: £92.40 (from £89.60)
  • Middle: £61.85 (from £60.00)
  • Lowest: £24.45 (from £23.70)

Mobility component

  • Higher: £64.50 (from £62.55)
  • Lower: £24.45 (from £23.70)

Employment and Support Allowance (ESA)

  • Under 25: £61.05 (from £59.20)
  • 25 or over: £77.00 (from £74.70)

Housing Benefit

Your personal allowance is used to help calculate how much housing benefit you may be entitled to.

Single person (personal allowance)

  • Under 25: £61.05 (from £59.20)
  • Aged 25 and between State Pension age: £77.00 (from £74.70)
  • Entitled to main phase ESA: £77.00 (from £74.70)
  • Has reached State Pension age: £197.10 (from £191.15)

Lone parent (personal allowance)

  • Under 25: £61.05 (from £59.20)
  • Aged 25 and between State Pension age: £77.00 (from £74.70)
  • Entitled to main phase ESA: £77.00 (from £74.70)
  • Has reached State Pension age: £197.10 (from £191.15)

Couple (personal allowance)

  • Both aged under 18: £92.20 (from £89.45)
  • One or both aged between 18 and state pension credit age: £121.05 (from £117.40)
  • Any age and on main phase ESA: £121.05 (from £117.40)
  • One or both have reached pension age: £294.90 from £286.05)

Incapacity Benefit (long-term)

  • April 2022 rate: £118.25 (from £114.70)

Income Support

  • Under 25: £61.05 (from £59.20)
  • 25 or over: £77.00 from (£74.70)

Jobseeker’s Allowance

Contributions based

  • Under 25: £61.05 (from £59.20)
  • 25 or over: £77.00 (from £74.70)

Income-based

  • Under 25: £61.05 (from £59.20)
  • 25 or over: £77.00 (from £74.70)

Maternity/Paternity/Shared Parental Allowance

  • Standard rate: £156.66 (from £151.97)

Pension Credit

  • Single: £182.60 (from £177.10)
  • Couple: £278.70 (from £270.30)

Personal Independence Payment (PIP)

Daily Living Component

  • Enhanced: £92.40 (from £89.60)
  • Standard: £61.85 (from £60.00)

Mobility Component

  • Enhanced: £64.50 (from £62.55)
  • Standard: £24.45 (from £23.70)

State Pension

  • Full New State Pension: £185.15 (from £179.60)
  • Basic Old State Pension (Category A or B): £141.85 (from £137.60)

Widow’s Pension

  • Standard rate: £126.35 (from £122.55)

Statutory Parental Bereavement Pay

  • Standard rate: £156.66 (from £151.97)

Statutory Sick Pay

  • Standard rate: £99.35 (from £96.35)

Universal Credit (monthly rates shown)

Standard allowance

Single

  • Single under 25: £265.31 (from £257.33)
  • Single 25 or over: £334.91 (from £324.84)
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